Latest CSN Articles

  • Comments: 0
  • 10 March 2015 00:00
  • in Community
  • Visits: 986
  • Last Modified: 12 March 2015 11:24
  • (Current Rating 0.0/5 Stars) Total Votes: 0

"I didn't know girls could box"

1 1
Amanda Coulson was just 14 when she started boxing, she went on to win four national titles, the GB championships and three European Union silver medals, before becoming a coach with GB Boxing and a Sport England Sporting Champion.

How did you first get in to boxing?
I saw an advert in the paper about two 13-year-old girls who were going to be the first ever females to box in Great Britain and that inspired me to want to give it a go, before that I didn’t know girls could box. But it was more the reactions I got from the coaches that made me want to excel in the sport.
I picked up the yellow pages and got a list of boxing numbers, the first response was a snigger, followed by ‘girls, in my club, you must be joking, love’. This made me more determined than ever to find somewhere that would take me on. The last number I had on my list was for the Hartlepool Boys Boxing Club, I had nothing to lose so I gave them a ring, the guy told me to come down watch a session and see what I thought, but he warned me that there’d be no leniency because I was a girl. I was determined to be successful to prove all these people wrong. 

In a traditionally male dominated sport, did you have any female role models? 
Throughout my career, it was all men; there were hardly any female boxers around, let alone coaches. There’s now Amanda Groake, who’s one of the GB performance coaches with me, she was one of the forerunners for female coaches in this country, and she was the first female coach to get the advanced coaching qualification. I always used to say to her ‘I’m going to be in your shoes one day’. She was definitely a role model, but they’re few and far between in boxing, it takes someone to take that leap of faith and take a step forward to allow more female coaches in. It has improved, there are a few more out there, and it’s certainly on the rise, as is female participation in boxing. 

Why did you become a coach?  
Boxing changed my life completely. With the help and guidance I’ve had from coaches along the way, I thought it would be nice to give something back. After a 16 year career in the sport, I’ve gained a lot of knowledge and experience; it felt only right that I should step into those shoes. Only now that I’ve started coaching have I realised that I’m paving the way for other people and helping to open doors. 

Is there integration between the male and female programmes at GB Boxing?
When I was a boxer and we first came onto the programme, I think everyone was a bit apprehensive; they’d never had girls in the gym before. Rob [McCracken] came in and said ‘you treat them as boxers, forget if they’re women or men’. From that point on we were all accepted fully into the programme. That is exactly the same for the coaches; you’re not a female coach, you’re not a male coach, you’re a coach. At GB Boxing, regardless of your gender or role, you’re treated as an equal.  

With role models such as Sporting Champion, Amanda Coulson taking the first steps in a male dominated arena, gender barriers are being broken and more girls than ever are stepping into the ring.

  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

No Comments Yet...

Leave a reply

Name: Required Field.
Email Address: Required Field. Not visible
Captcha Code: Required Field.
Comment: Required Field.